Faulkner expects high scores in ODI series

For all the talk of ball dominating bat in New Zealand, James Faulkner senses there could be more big totals in the ODI section of Australia’s tour.

杭州桑拿

Australia have a chance to regain the No.1 Test ranking when they face the Black Caps in a two-Test series this month.

Before that, there will be three one-day internationals, with the first to be played on Wednesday in Auckland.

Both sides have scored runs with remarkable ease in limited-overs action since meeting in last year’s World Cup final.

Faulkner highlighted the threat of swing bowling in the land of the long white cloud, like many of his teammates in recent days.

But the allrounder added there was no reason the rivals couldn’t both post big totals in the Chappell-Hadlee series.

“Everyone wants to see high scores – especially with their batting line-up and how experienced they are at the top and through the middle and … the same with us,” Faulkner said.

“You’re going to expect high scores.

“It’s a matter of who can adjust early and against the new ball that swings.

“There’s no reason why not; (why) teams can’t get 350 or 400. A lot of it just comes down to conditions.”

Eden Park’s close boundaries would ordinarily entice and excite Australia’s batsmen on Wednesday.

But the postage-stamp venue proved a siren call in the 2015 World Cup, when Australia lost after collapsing to 9-106.

“The big factor that everyone noticed was just how loud they were and how passionate they were supporting New Zealand,” Faulkner said, having sat that match out because of injury.

“That’s what home-ground advantage is all about.

“(Australia will have to) really put them under pressure on their home turf because they’re going to be really tough.

“You’re going to see … fierce competition.”

The trans-Tasman rivalry might have simmered in recent years but it’s very much alive following NZ’s resurgence.

As Brendon McCullum’s men proved in last year’s tournament, they’re among the best ODI sides in the world.

“Speaking to other players in hotels, they (all mentioned how New Zealand) were so hard to play against in their own conditions,” Faulkner said.

“It’s going to be a great series.”

The Twenty20 World Cup is Australia’s next major white-ball assignment but Faulkner insists his mind is focused on the task at hand.

“After that, we’ll worry about South Africa and the T20 World Cup,” he said.

Faulkner is renowned as ‘The Finisher’ for his knack of delivering victory in ODI run-chases.

The 25-year-old instead spent little time at the crease during the recent five-match series against India – and that suited him just fine.

“Our batting was so good in the last series I tended to come out in the 49th or the 50th over,” he said.

“I tend to look at it as a positive. It means our batting order, our top half are doing an exceptional job.”